Alan Moore Interview

Alan Moore was born on the 25th November 1974 in Dublin, Ireland he started his career at Middlesbrough in 1991 and spent ten years at the club making 114 appearances, scoring 14 goals. Whilst at the club he was once described as “the Ryan Giggs of the north-east”.

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A transfer to Turf Moor followed as Moore signed for Burnley in 2001, he went on to make 69 appearances, scoring 4 goals in a three-year spell.

Moore returned home to Ireland during the summer of 2004 and signed for Shelbourne where he had an immediate impact on the team. In the UEFA Champions League qualifiers he scored away to KR Reykjavik to help secure a 2–2 draw.

In the second round he scored a hat trick at home and scored away against Hajduk Split who Shelbourne knocked out 4–3 on aggregate. Shelbourne were eventually knocked out by Deportivo La Coruna in the last round before the group stages.

By the end of 2004, Moore had helped Shelbourne retain the League of Ireland Premier Division title for the first time. In 2006, Moore won another League of Ireland championship medal as the Dublin side pipped Derry City to the title on goal difference.

In March 2007, Moore signed for Derry City to work with his former manager Pat Fenlon once again. However he failed to settle at the club and he signed for Sligo Rovers in February 2008.

Alan Moore retired from the game in July 2008 after failing to recover from a back injury. In October 2008 he joined jim Crawford as assistant caretaker manager at Shamrock Rovers.

Moore then spent time, as Youth Team manager at Carlisle United before returning to Middlesbrough as a scout for the club were he started his career.

Interview

Biggest influence on your career and why?

The biggest career influence was a man called John Pickering who is sadly no longer with us. A great coach at every level and a wonderful human being to go with it. He could see what made people tick and this skill in coaching is the key for me.

Your Football Highlight?

The highlight of my career was playing for my country (Eire) at senior level, in fact at every level for that matter.

Your Football Lowlight?

Honestly, I didn’t enjoy my time at Burnley after the first season there were too many off field things were happening around the club which I allowed it to drag me down and stopped enjoying the sport.

League Debut?

My debut came as a sub in the premier league v Everton at home, my full debut came against Notts County where I scored 2 and set up the other in a 3-2 win.

Best Goal you Scored & Why?

I scored a goal on the run from distance v Nottingham Forest away and the keeper never moved. I like this not only for the strike but also the keeper’s reaction.

Toughest Opponent & why?

Edgar Davids playing for Holland, I spent the whole game just chased shadows. It was an excellent Dutch team at that time.

Best player you played with & why?

Emerson at Middlesbrough he had everything strong, quick and he could play too. Could be a sitting midfielder or an attacking number ten.

Best Manager you played for & why?

Best manager I played for was Mick McCarthy for two reasons. He did what John Pickering did in getting to know his players and he always protected his team and squad and still does to this day.

Your Strengths (As a Player)?

I think my strengths as a player I was that I was technically very good with a turn of pace and I could see an early pass.

Your Weakness (As a Player)?

I think my weakness was my right foot and I would say I had to many injuries.

How did it feel to be called “the Ryan Giggs of the north-east”?

It didn’t bother me either way.

If you could change one rule in football what would it be?

Get rid of those officials behind the touchline! What do they do?

What’s it like to play for your country?

Growing up as a kid it was all I dreamed about doing and I did everything I could to make sure that dream became reality.

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